Tag Archives: writing

Holidays Greetings 2017

 

All of us are writers in one way or anotherAs such, we understand the importance of rewriting and tightening our drafts. We always look for ways to eliminate unnecessary adverbs or adjectives, phrases, and other redundant words in sentences. With this thought in mind, here is my special and somewhat witty holiday greeting for you.

Rough draft:

Wishing you a merry and blessed Christmas and a happy and prosperous New Year.

First rewrite:

Wishing you a merry Christmas and a happy New Year.

Second rewrite:

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year.

Third rewrite:

Merry Christmas and more.

Fourth rewrite:

Happy Holidays.

Final draft:

Hi!

—Charles and Laura


Yea, I know; I’ve blogged this greeting before, but it’s still applicable. Happy Holidays y’all.


 

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16 Things I Would Tell My Younger Writing Self

Much wisdom in this post, especially for writers. Another great article by Anita Agers-Brooks from WordServe Water Cooler.

WordServe Water Cooler

Writer ComparisonsWhen I was starting out, I learned some of my expectations were myth instead of facts. For me, it’s another reminder that there are things in life I don’t know I don’t know, until I experience for myself. Can you relate? In hindsight, there are several things I would tell my younger writing self.

Sixteen Things That Surprised Me As a New Writer

  1. Book signings rarely spur big sales — they’re more hype than help. But good speaking events still consistently drive buyers to your book tables.
  2. Once you succeed as a published author, at least 25% of the people you meet will want you to help them write the book they’ve always dreamed of writing. For free.
  3. You will need to protect your writing time fiercely. The more you achieve, the more other things will try to impede.
  4. Publishing success is not always fair. A good book can…

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Seven Steps to Guaranteed Success as a Writer

Excellent post. I found much to like about this article—and some helpful wisdom. Although success in writing can be measured in many ways, the best one, at least for me, is when my work accomplishes the purpose God has for it.

WordServe Water Cooler

Every author seems to have a different idea of what “success” in their field means to him or her. For some, selling at least five thousand (in Canada) or ten thousand (in the States) books, thereby qualifying them to claim the lofty title of “Bestselling Author” is the goal on which they set their sights. For others, maybe it’s a hundred thousand copies, or a million.

For some, it isn’t about the numbers, but about awards. But which award is the one that will make them feel as though they have finally arrived? Is it the Carol? The Christie? The Pulitzer? I’ve noticed several big-name authors who have won awards in the past entering the contests again, so maybe one award isn’t enough. What, then, is the magic number?

Or maybe it’s a certain amount of positive feedback, a sufficient number of glowing reviews on Amazon or Goodreads, recognition at…

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How to Know if You are a Writer – Matthew 7:24-29

A great post by Kathy S. Davis. Not just for writers, but for anyone who is passionate about their craft.

Kathy Davis

I was perched near the top of a tall building, under the Tower of Babel sign, trying to address the crowd. The problem was, only a few of my listeners understood what I was saying. The rest were raising a ruckus trying to find someone who spoke their language, making it impossible for anyone to hear me. My nightmare turned out just as it did in the Bible, my audience parting a hundred different ways.

I’m glad it was only a dream.

obyvatel. stockxchngIs writing for you?

The need to communicate with others is a basic need, but how do you know if writing is the best outlet for you?

The first thing I would ask, if you wonder about calling yourself a writer, is how important is it to you?

I have been writing consistently for more than forty years. Writing helps me think, or understand, my world. It helps me communicate better when I speak, because I’ve…

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How to survive the book review blues

For those of you who are writers, here are four things to remember about reviews and not-so-helpful comments.

WordServe Water Cooler

roses I have a love-hate relationship with book reviews.

Every time I get a good review, I’m happy. When I get a stellar review, I’m ecstatic. I feel like I’ve done what I hoped to do: I’ve connected with a reader and given them a journey they wouldn’t have experienced otherwise. When dog-lovers tell me they laughed, cried, and were inspired by my memoir Saved by Gracie: How a rough-and-tumble rescue dog dragged me back to health, happiness, and God, I feel blessed that my story reached and touched them. When reviewers rave that my supernatural thriller Heaven’s Gate: Archangels Book I made them want to stand up and cheer, I get goosebumps of joy.

All those multi-starred reviews on my books’ pages at amazon.com, Goodreads, or barnesandnoble.com reassure me that the hours I pour into my writing are worth it: my books entertain, educate, and illuminate, and, gosh darn…

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Holiday Greetings to All

Yea, I know, I’ve blogged this message before, but it’s still applicable. Happy holidays to everyone.

Charles Earl Harrel

Merry Christmas

All of us are writers in one way or another. As such, we understand the importance of rewriting and tightening our drafts. We always look for ways to eliminate unnecessary adverbs or adjectives, phrases, and other redundant words in sentences. With this thought in mind, here is my special and somewhat witty holiday greeting for you.

Rough draft:

Wishing you a merry and blessed Christmas and a happy and prosperous New Year.

First rewrite:

Wishing you a merry Christmas and a happy New Year.

Second rewrite:

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year.

Third rewrite:

Merry Christmas and more.

Fourth rewrite:

Happy Holidays.

Final draft:

Hi!

—Charles and Laura

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Action Needed! — Devotions for Teachers…

What are you doing in your classroom to mirror Jesus? From Google: mir·ror ˈmirər/ noun noun: mirror; plural noun: mirrors 1. a reflective surface, now typically of glass coated with a metal amalgam, that reflects a clear image. synonyms: reflecting surface; More something regarded as accurately representing something else. “the stage is supposed to […]

via Action Needed! — Devotions for Teachers…